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Queen’s Physical Therapy student while on clinical placement at the CRP in Bangladesh.

QE II Scholarships: Creating Leaders in International Community Based Rehabilitation

Contributed By: Dr. Heather Aldersey

In March of this year, Queen’s School of Rehabilitation Therapy was pleased to announce that it would be a host for Queen Elizabeth II (QE II) Scholars in International Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR). Through the provision of training and support, CBR equalizes opportunities, and promotes inclusion and the human rights of persons with disabilities. The unique QE II program will run from 2015-2018, the students selected for this prestigious scholarship, will be named “Queen Elizabeth Scholars”.[1]

The QE II program at the School of Rehabilitation Therapy will develop leaders in international CBR. In order to fulfill this ambitious mission, the program will offer:

  • Up to three scholarships for Canadian Rehabilitation Science Master’s or PhD students to conduct thesis or dissertation research with the Access to Health and Education for all Children and Youth with Disabilities (AHEAD) project in Bangladesh.
  • Up to sixteen advanced practicum and community development placements with the AHEAD project and its partner, the Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed (CRP) in Bangladesh.
  • Up to four full scholarships for young leaders from Asian and African Commonwealth countries to complete a PhD in Rehabilitation Science at Queen’s.

Queen’s Physical Therapy student while on clinical placement at the CRP in Bangladesh.

Throughout their time in the program, Queen Elizabeth scholars from all three streams will engage with each other and with Queen Elizabeth scholars from across Canada and other Commonwealth countries. These connections will support the development of a global network of leaders, committed to enabling positive change in communities throughout the world.

 

As part of their participation in the program, QE II Scholars will also provide new insight and support to the activities of the International Centre for the Advancement of Community Based Rehabilitation (ICACBR) at Queen’s School of Rehabilitation Therapy. The ICACBR’s mission is to improve access of people with disabilities and their families to health and social services. For nearly 25 years, the ICACBR has engaged Canadians including Queen’s students, faculty and staff in projects in more than 20 countries.[2]

Recruitment for the first stream of Rehabilitation Science students is occurring on a rolling basis. Canadian Master’s or PhD students interested in conducting CBR research in Bangladesh are encouraged to contact Dr. Heather Aldersey for more information. Recruitment for the second stream of candidates will begin in late July. Interested OT students should watch out for future program emails for more information.

Finally, recruitment of the third stream of candidates is underway! Please watch the School of Rehabilitation Therapy’s News Blog in the fall when the four new PhD students will introduce themselves to the Queen’s community here!

[1] For more information about the ICACBR and the AHEAD Project in Bangladesh,  visit the Centre’s website: http://rehab.queensu.ca/icacbr

[2] For more information about the QE II Scholarship program offered throughout Canada, visit the AUCC website: http://www.aucc.ca/programs-services/international-programs/canadian-queen-elizabeth-ii-diamond-jubilee-scholarships/

Dr. Heather Aldersey is Assistant Professor and Queen’s National Scholar at the School of Rehabilitation Therapy as well as the Director of the Access to Health and Education for all Children and Youth with Disabilities (AHEAD) project at the International Centre for the Advancement of Community Based Rehabilitation.  Dr. Aldersey’s research interests include the social construction of disability across cultures, support for people with disabilities and their families, public policy, family innovation, and family quality of life; with the goal of drawing upon local strengths and capabilities to improve the quality of life of people with disabilities and their families globally.

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